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The Daughter Who Got Away

$14.95

2016 National Indie Excellence Award Finalist!

Celia is a 70-year-old New York artist and educator whose grown daughter Sharon has escaped Jewish East Coast life to live in a tumble-down cabin in British Columbia. Celia braves a visit to the wilderness, where she and Sharon become involved with an idiosyncratic Jewish community. What this community lacks in Yiddishkeit it makes up for in heart and spirit.

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Product Description

2016 National Indie Excellence Award Finalist!

by Leora Freedman

Celia is a 70-year-old New York artist and educator whose grown daughter Sharon has escaped the pace and expectations of Jewish East coast life to live in a tumble-down cabin in British Columbia.  Following a personal crisis, Celia braves a visit to the wilderness, where she and Sharon become involved with an idiosyncratic Jewish community made up of people one doesn’t meet in Manhattan.  What this community lacks in Yiddishkeit it makes up for in heart and spirit.

After facing some of her own demons in this isolated and beautiful place, Celia gains strength and perspective on her life.  She returns to New York having triumphed over some of the problems of aging and loss, and opens an unexpectedly romantic chapter of her life.  In this novel, stories within stories illuminate the past and present of Celia’s family, whose history ranges from czarist Russia to 1930’s Palestine, up to the present moment in North America.

Additional Information

Weight .75 lbs
Dimensions 8.5 x 5.5 x .6 in
Format

Paperback

Also Available As

eBook

ISBN

978-1-59287-140-7

On sale

April 1, 2016

Reviews

  1. yotzeret

    :

    “Freedman is as skilled at capturing the nuances of religious practice as she is at sketching the wild and beautiful Canadian landscape. Though the novel details Israeli and New York locales, Freedman’s writing shines most when she’s honoring the setting where no one would expect to encounter complex discussions related to Jewish identity. Themes of change and continuity, acceptance and rejection are all handled with elegance. The Daughter Who Got Away is a moving and provocative encounter with various modes of religious being.”
    —Foreword Reviews

  2. yotzeret

    :

    “For me, Leora Freedman’s wonderful new book is a vivid and magical time capsule from an era and a place which are extremely dear to me: the Upper West Side of Manhattan, where my grandmother lived for much of the twentieth century. With artistic skill, Freedman manages to bring people like my grandmother and the society she inhabited back to life.”
    —Chana Jenny Weisberg, blogger at http://www.jewishMOM.com and author of Expecting Miracles and One Baby Step at a Time

  3. yotzeret

    :

    “In this compassionate family saga spanning generations and continents, Celia, an aging sophisticated New Yorker, sets out into the wilderness of British Columbia to retrieve her free-spirited daughter Sharon, who abandoned a privileged city life for a hut in the bush. With vivid imagery, Freedman brings the setting alive. The author reveals wisdom and sensitivity in capturing the contrasting worlds of Celia and Sharon as the two bond together and are enriched by the reunion. This is a rich and powerful work: lyrical, contemplative, and polished.”
    —Lily Poritz Miller, author of In a Pale Blue Light and The Newcomers

  4. yotzeret

    :

    The Daughter Who Got Away is an engrossing and accessible novel. Set in greatly varied environments and time frames, Leora Freedman’s novel captures intergenerational ethos through the prism of family relationships and diverse cultural experience. A novel of ideas, The Daughter Who Got Away reflects the complexities of Jewish existence of our time in multi-layered stories and engaging characters. It is a work that stays with the reader and deserves a wide readership.”
    —Frieda Forman, editor and translator of The Exile Book of Yiddish Women Writers and Found Treasures: Stories by Yiddish Women Writers

  5. yotzeret

    :

    “In this warm, insightful, and often funny novel, Leora Freedman plumbs the mystery of how—and to what extent—we can love one another across differences of culture, belief, affiliation, and even temperament. And in Celia and Sharon Rosenbloom, she has created two women who show us that it’s never too late for growth, change, and mutual understanding.”
    —Susan Olding, author of Pathologies: A Life in Essays

  6. yotzeret

    :

    “Leora Freedman paints a colorful collage of people, place and time: including the younger and older characters, the urban and wilderness settings, and the present and past generations. The Jewish flavor and nostalgia for Yiddishkeit are woven throughout The Daughter Who Got Away. Freedman demonstrates beautifully in this multilayered story that universal human themes such as aging and human connection are indeed shared by all people; thus our personal stories are linked to our collective history.”
    —Liz Pearl, editor of Living Legacies: A Collection of Writing by Contemporary Canadian Jewish Women

  7. yotzeret

    :

    “This is a novel steeped in the details and nuances of life in Jewish communities, whether in the rural expanses of British Columbia or among the urban enclaves of Manhattan. It is bustling with scenes and conversations full of insight and generosity, holding up a mirror to the attempts we all make at forging connections between family members across the generations, even as we take our own deepest measure.”
    —Linda Rui Feng, author of City of Marvel and Transformation: Chang’an and Narratives of Experience in Tang Dynasty China

  8. yotzeret

    :

    “Leora Freedman’s novel The Daughter Who Got Away is a touching story of a mother and daughter who each undergo a spiritual transformation while coming to terms with their underlying differences. Set in two polar opposite Jewish communities (Upper West Side Manhattan and rural British Columbia), Freedman’s novel explores the tension between assimilation and religious renewal. Populated with a diverse array of characters, the novel offers a glimpse into the ways in which Jewish life can flourish in disparate settings.”
    —Sharon Hart-Green, author of Bridging the Divide: The Selected Poems of Hava Pinhas-Cohen

  9. yotzeret

    :

    “The marvel of Leora Freedman’s splendid novel The Daughter Who Got Away is that the story gets so deeply inside both Celia, a widowed Jewish Manhattan mother, and Sharon, her wilderness-loving daughter. The rich voices of both the older and the younger woman fill a whole continent with the texture of their relationship. They evolve to a fascinating balance when the New Yorker comes to her daughter’s outpost in British Columbia. Whether in a solitary Canadian cabin or a huge Central Park West apartment, whether with a sexy shepherd single dad and his ethereal daughter or a rabbi or the ghost of a deceased husband, a constellation of relationships unfolds, all in the midst of questions of Jewish life and how—and where—to live it. Misunderstandings abound, but this novel, exquisitely attuned to nature and to human nature, is about understanding. Freedman writes for mothers and daughters everywhere.”
    —Molly Peacock, author of The Paper Garden

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